BEGINNING JUNE 2014, GRAPHICAL TROPICAL WEATHER OUTLOOK WILL BE GREATLY IMPROVED!

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The most deadly hurricane in U.S. history was the Galveston hurricane on September 8, 1900. The actual number of victims could not be determined because it was a popular tourist location and area population numbers were of little help. There may have been between 6,000 and 12,000 fatalities. The official number has been placed at 8,000.

The local Meteorologist-in-Charge, Dr. Isaac M. Cline, rode through the town in a horse and buggy to warn the residents when he realized that this was not a typical hurricane. As the Gulf water inundated the lower floor of buildings, residents watched out their second floor windows as people clung to telephone poles and climbed on roof. Inside one of the buildings an old man’s attention was fixed on the falling barometer. When it finally leveled at 27.64 inched, he proclaimed that they had already experienced the fiercest part of the hurricane.

Galveston Hurricane Sept 8 1900

The fact that ocean shores attract so many people to the sandy beaches and the waters provide a livelihood for local fishermen can be an unexpected disaster for those who are not aware of the deadly Storm Surge. Storms like Sandy in 2012 were a reminder to the mid-Atlantic coast in 2012. In June 1957, 416 residents of Cameron, LA delayed their evacuation from hurricane Audrey. They lost their lives because the storm arrived two hours earlier than predicted. On September 24, 2008 an intense storm surge from hurricane Ike destroyed 61% of the houses on Bolivar peninsula which is near Galveston, TX.

Hurricane IKE Sept 24 2008

 

 

 

 

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